AQUARTICLES•COM

Home

Main Index of Articles

Main Management Index

Search


Please read the 'Agreement' section on the View Articles page before downloading this article.


 

ARTICLE INFORMATION:
Author:
S.N. Nagendra 
Title: Salt Baths for Fishes

Summary: Injured or infected fish may be treated with a salt bath. What this does. Return the fish to its tank with care.
Contact for editing purposes:
e-mail:
c/o Beta, at: flare79@yahoo.com
Date first published:
September 2004
Publication: indianaquariumhobbyist.com
Reprinted from Aquarticles:
December 2004: UnderWater, Iowa Aquaria Asociation
April 2005: Fish Tales, Bermuda Fry-Angle Aquarium Soc.
ARTICLE USE: 
Internet publication (club or non-profit web site):

1. Credit author, original publication, and Aquarticles.
2.  Link to http://www.aquarticles.com  and original website if applicable.
3.  Advise Aquarticles
Printed publication:
Mail
two printed copies to:
S. N. Nagendra,
c/o Hon. Secretary,
Aquarists Society of Karnataka,
Government Aquarium,
Cubbon Park,
Bangalore-560 001
India.
And one copy to:
Aquarticles.com
#205 - 5525 West Boulevard
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6M 3W6
Canada

Salt Baths for Fishes

by S. N. Nagendra
of India
Aquarticles

We have all given salt baths to fishes. A short-period-dip and they are out, back to the tank. Many times we have also seen that the moment they are released back into main tank they wriggle about, run randomly, dart back and forth, etc. with heavy breathing. Hardy type fishes survive, the sensitive ones die! Why does this happen? Read further to find out...

Salt as medicine:
Whenever a fish is affected by external parasites or injuries, it leads to infection. Basically because the water in which the fish live contains several different kinds of bacteria and although they are normally good, infection may give rise to bad ones.

As a response to the infection on the fish's body (inflammatory response), there will be an increase in the water content of the involved tissues.

Water tends to follow salt. Hence, a fish placed in a dip-tub with a high concentration of salt tends to lose water due to osmosis (the movement of water molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration).

Cell membranes are completely permeable to water; therefore the environment to which the cell is exposed can have a dramatic effect on the cell.

If the tank water has a higher salt concentration than the fish's intrinsic salt concentration, it will tend to draw out some of the fluid from the infected cells of the fish thereby killing the infectious bacteria. This will give some relief to the fish, but the fish will feel an energy burnout.

After salt bath:
The fish when placed in the main tank after a salt dip, tends to absorb a lot of water as the salt content will be high inside its cells…therefore there is a possibility of cell rupturing happening inside the fish's body…which may even lead to the death of the fish within a few minutes. This is definite if the fish is of a delicate species.

Hence, once the salt bath is done, don't remove the fish from the bucket immediately. Instead, add water slowly to the bucket until the concentration of salt becomes negligible. Then, after a brief period of confinement, move the fish back to the main tank. Make sure it is adapted to the main tank temperature. This ensures that the fish will not be affected by sudden changes in water conditions.